Pdf ebook: The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying

Pdf download ebook The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying

Summary: Few issues apply universally to people as poignantly as death and dying. All religions address concerns with death from the handling of human remains, to d

  • Author : N.a
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317528875
  • Genre: Religion
  • Number of Pages: 594
  • Language: English
  • Views: 929
  • Downloads: 929
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Description: Few issues apply universally to people as poignantly as death and dying. All religions address concerns with death from the handling of human remains, to defining death, to suggesting what happens after life. The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying provides readers with an overview of the study of death and dying. Questions of death, mortality, and more recently of end-of-life care, have long been important ones and scholars from a range of fields have approached the topic in a number of ways. Comprising over fifty-two chapters from a team of international contributors, the companion covers: funerary and mourning practices; concepts of the afterlife; psychical issues associated with death and dying; clinical and ethical issues; philosophical issues; death and dying as represented in popular culture. This comprehensive collection of essays will bring together perspectives from fields as diverse as history, philosophy, literature, psychology, archaeology and religious studies, while including various religious traditions, including established religions like Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism as well as new or less widely known traditions such as the Spiritualist Movement, the Church of Latter Day Saints, and Raëlianism. The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying is essential reading for students and researchers in religious studies, philosophy and literature.


Pdf ebook: Framing the Jina

Pdf download ebook Framing the Jina

Summary: John Cort explores the narratives by which the Jains have explained the presence of icons of Jinas (their enlightened and liberated teachers) that are wors

  • Author : John Cort
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190452579
  • Genre: Religion
  • Number of Pages: 416
  • Language: English
  • Views: 1054
  • Downloads: 1054
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Description: John Cort explores the narratives by which the Jains have explained the presence of icons of Jinas (their enlightened and liberated teachers) that are worshiped and venerated in the hundreds of thousands of Jain temples throughout India. Most of these narratives portray icons favorably, and so justify their existence; but there are also narratives originating among iconoclastic Jain communities that see the existence of temple icons as a sign of decay and corruption. The veneration of Jina icons is one of the most widespread of all Jain ritual practices. Nearly every Jain community in India has one or more elaborate temples, and as the Jains become a global community there are now dozens of temples in North America, Europe, Africa, and East Asia. The cult of temples and icons goes back at least two thousand years, and indeed the largest of the four main subdivisions of the Jains are called Murtipujakas, or "Icon Worshipers." A careful reading of narratives ranging over the past 15 centuries, says Cort, reveals a level of anxiety and defensiveness concerning icons, although overt criticism of the icons only became explicit in the last 500 years. He provides detailed studies of the most important pro- and anti-icon narratives. Some are in the form of histories of the origins and spread of icons. Others take the form of cosmological descriptions, depicting a vast universe filled with eternal Jain icons. Finally, Cort looks at more psychological explanations of the presence of icons, in which icons are defended as necessary spiritual corollaries to the very fact of human embodiedness.


Pdf ebook: Akbar the Great Mogul, 1542-1605

Pdf download ebook Akbar the Great Mogul, 1542-1605

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  • Author : Vincent Arthur Smith
  • Publisher: Dalcassian Publishing Company
  • ISBN:
  • Genre: Mogul Empire
  • Number of Pages: 379
  • Language: English
  • Views: 1669
  • Downloads: 1669
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Pdf ebook: Art of India

Pdf download ebook Art of India

Summary: If the ‘Palace of Love’, otherwise known as the Taj Mahal, is considered to be the emblem of Mughal Art, it is by no means the sole representative. Cha

  • Author : Vincent Arthur Smith
  • Publisher: Parkstone International
  • ISBN: 1783107839
  • Genre: Art
  • Number of Pages: 370
  • Language: English
  • Views: 1284
  • Downloads: 1284
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Description: If the ‘Palace of Love’, otherwise known as the Taj Mahal, is considered to be the emblem of Mughal Art, it is by no means the sole representative. Characterised by its elegance, splendor, and Persian and European influences, Mughal Art manifests itself equally well in architecture and painting as in decorative art.


Pdf ebook: On Yuan Chwang's travels in India, 629-645 A.D

Pdf download ebook On Yuan Chwang's travels in India, 629-645 A.D

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  • Author : Thomas Watters
  • Publisher: Dalcassian Publishing Company
  • ISBN:
  • Genre: Buddha and buddhism
  • Number of Pages: N.A
  • Language: English
  • Views: 361
  • Downloads: 361
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Pdf ebook: An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

Pdf download ebook An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

Summary: An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism is a comprehensive survey of Indian Buddhism from its origins in the 6th century BCE, through its ascendance i

  • Author : Lars Fogelin
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190266929
  • Genre: Religion
  • Number of Pages: 264
  • Language: English
  • Views: 679
  • Downloads: 679
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Description: An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism is a comprehensive survey of Indian Buddhism from its origins in the 6th century BCE, through its ascendance in the 1st millennium CE, and its eventual decline in mainland South Asia by the mid-2nd millennium CE. Weaving together studies of archaeological remains, architecture, iconography, inscriptions, and Buddhist historical sources, this book uncovers the quotidian concerns and practices of Buddhist monks and nuns (the sangha), and their lay adherents--concerns and practices often obscured in studies of Buddhism premised largely, if not exclusively, on Buddhist texts. At the heart of Indian Buddhism lies a persistent social contradiction between the desire for individual asceticism versus the need to maintain a coherent community of Buddhists. Before the early 1st millennium CE, the sangha relied heavily on the patronage of kings, guilds, and ordinary Buddhists to support themselves. During this period, the sangha emphasized the communal elements of Buddhism as they sought to establish themselves as the leaders of a coherent religious order. By the mid-1st millennium CE, Buddhist monasteries had become powerful political and economic institutions with extensive landholdings and wealth. This new economic self-sufficiency allowed the sangha to limit their day-to-day interaction with the laity and begin to more fully satisfy their ascetic desires for the first time. This withdrawal from regular interaction with the laity led to the collapse of Buddhism in India in the early-to-mid 2nd millennium CE. In contrast to the ever-changing religious practices of the Buddhist sangha, the Buddhist laity were more conservative--maintaining their religious practices for almost two millennia, even as they nominally shifted their allegiances to rival religious orders. This book also serves as an exemplar for the archaeological study of long-term religious change through the perspectives of practice theory, materiality, and semiotics.